Blog Archives

FlinterFile: Fats Domino- Blueberry Hill

The original version of the song was recorded by Gene Autry in 1940. Read the rest of this entry

Song of the day: Roy Orbison- Ooby Dooby

roy orbison ooby dooby

It wasn’t the first, but the second single Roy Orbison ever released. He did so in 1956, and reached the US chart with it on number 59. In this time, Roy Orbison still was with a band, the Teen Kings. They got the advice of Johnny Cash to join Sun Records. They did so, recorded Ooby Dooby, and then the band left Orbison. He went on as a solo-artist, having hits with Pretty Woman and You Got It. Enjoy

Roy Orbison- Ooby Dooby

Song of the day: Elvis Presley- Don’t Be Cruel

Elvis-Presley-Dont-Be-Cruel

In 1956, Otis Blackwell wrote a song together with Elvis Presley. Well, Elvis sort of leaned back and Blackwell wrote the song. Probably Elvis made some changes, but the deal was like this: if Elvis was given a part of the song writing credits, he would record it and a sale of more than a million records was guaranteed. And it did: in 1961 it had already sold more than six million records. The song was a number 1 hit in 1956, too. Enjoy

Elvis Presley- Don’t Be Cruel

Song of the day: The Platters- Only You

the-platters-only-you-power-records

Buck Ram once composed a song called Only You (And You Alone). The song was then recorded by Williams and the Platters in 1954, but had no success. When the Platters recorded the song again in 1955, it was a big hit. This was due to Tony Williams, whose voice broke during recordings and a funny effect in this Only You. When the car of the Platters broke down, he did Ohhhnly You. This, and Ram playing the piano, brought a number 1 hit in the R&B chart and a number 5 in the normal American chart. Enjoy

The Platters- Only You

Song of the day: Elvis Presley- Heartbreak Hotel

Heartbreak-hotel

In this Fifties February, we can’t ignore Elvis Presley. Therefore, Monday is Elvis Monday! The song was released in 1956 and became a number 1 hit in the US. The writers have different versions of how the song was written. One, Mae Boren Axton, says an article about a suicide of a man had a big impact. This man only left a note with “I walk a lonely street”. She then gave the idea of putting up a Heartbreak Hotel at the end of every street, the inspiration for the title. Tommy Durden says the song was already finished when this article was printed. However, Elvis recorded it and had a hit with it. Enjoy

Elvis Presley- Heartbreak Hotel

Song of the day: Gene Vincent- Be-Bop-A-Lula

gene-vincent-be-bop-a-lula

Welcome to February, Fifties February! This song originates from 1956, when Gene Vincent and his Blue Caps recorded the song! This song is credited to Gene Vincent and his manager, Bill Davis. Apparently, Gene Vincent wrote the song in a hospital. He wrote the tune, and the lyrics were written by Donald Graves. Bill Davis bought the lyrics for a low amount of money (sources vary) and credited himself. The song made it to number 16 in the UK and number 7 in the US! Enjoy

Gene Vincent- Be-Bop-A-Lula

Song of the day: Doris Day- Que Sera, Sera (Whatever Will Be Will Be)

doris-day-que-sera-sera-whatever-will-be-will-be

An golden oldie today! Alfred Hitchcock made the movie The Man Who Knew Too Much, starring James Stewart and Doris Day, in 1956. Of course he needed a title song, which was written by Jay Livingston and Ray Evans. The song would be sung by Doris Day, and it would be number 2 in the US and even number 1 in the UK! Normie Rowe would later chart with a cover of this song on number 1 in Australia. Enjoy

Doris Day- Que Sera, Sera (Whatever Will Be Will Be)