Category Archives: 1950-1959

FlinterFile: Henry Mancini- Peter Gunn

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In 1958, Henry Mancini recorded a theme song for a new television series: Peter Gunn. The theme song, which is very simple, since it only knows one chord, would be a rock ‘n roll success. Read the rest of this entry

FlinterFile: Frankie Laine- Rawhide

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In 1959, the television series Rawhide started. The series, running for seven years, saw the rise of Clint Eastwood. Of course, the TV-series couldn’t do without a tune. The song was sung by Frankie Laine, and written by two composers who had dealt with western music earlier: Dimitri Tiomkin and Ned Washington. They made a sort of cattleride of it, including whips. The song was later popular again because the Blues Brothers used it. It was a number 6 hit in the UK. Enjoy

Frankie Laine- Rawhide

Song of the day: Peggy Lee- Fever

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In 1958, Peggy Lee covered a song by Little Willie John. Eddie Cooley and Otis Blackwell wrote the song in 1956 for Little Willie John. He made it to number 1 in the R&B charts. Two years later, Peggy Lee took the first and fourth verse and recorded them together with some other verses, which include Romeo & Juliet. She reached number 5 in the UK and number 8 in the US. Enjoy

Peggy Lee- Fever

Song of the day: Bill Haley & His Comets- See You Later Alligator

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In 1955, Robert Charles Guidry, better known as Bobby Charles, recorded the song Later Alligator. It was a blues song with a melody which came from the song Later For You Baby by Guitar Slim. Bill Haley & his Comets took the song, made it more of an uptempo song and recorded it in New York in 1955. The song was featured in their movie Rock Around The Clock in 1956, and therefore the song also reached number 6 in the US. The song would be the last big hit for Bill Haley. Enjoy

Bill Haley & His Comets- See You Later Alligator

Song of the day: Connie Francis- Stupid Cupid

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In 1958, Connie Francis had hit the charts with Who’s Sorry Now, which became her breakthrough single. However, the follow-up single had flopped and she needed a good song to keep her success. In the search for this song, she heard nothing good. Then Howard Greenfield and Neil Sedaka came along, and they played some of their songs. She asked for something more lively, and then they played Stupid Cupid. She liked it, recorded it and it made her return to the charts, on number 14! The UK loved this song even more, bringing it to number 1. Enjoy

Connie Francis- Stupid Cupid

Song of the day: The Everly Brothers- All I Have To Do Is Dream

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In 1958, the songwriter team Felice & Boudleaux Bryant wrote All I Have To Do Is Dream. The song was recorded by the Everly Brothers in the same year, and hit number 1 in all US Billboard charts at the same time. It would also be a number 1 hit in the UK. The b-side of the single, Claudette, was the first success in songwriting for Roy Orbison. Therefore, Roy quit Sun Records and went to Acuff-Rose Music, the label of the Everly Brothers. Enjoy

The Everly Brothers- All I Have To Do Is Dream

Song of the day: Muddy Waters- Mannish Boy

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For the origins of this song, we have to go back to the song Hoochie Coochie Man, which was written by Willie Dixon and sung by Muddy Waters. The song got a reply by Bo Diddley, called I’m Your Man. Both the first and the second song got the melody line which was used in Mannish Boy by Muddy Waters. No need explaining that this song was a reply to the song by Diddley. The song was recorded in 1955, and reached number 5 in the R&B chart of the US. Enjoy

Muddy Waters- Mannish Boy

Song of the day: Roy Orbison- Ooby Dooby

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It wasn’t the first, but the second single Roy Orbison ever released. He did so in 1956, and reached the US chart with it on number 59. In this time, Roy Orbison still was with a band, the Teen Kings. They got the advice of Johnny Cash to join Sun Records. They did so, recorded Ooby Dooby, and then the band left Orbison. He went on as a solo-artist, having hits with Pretty Woman and You Got It. Enjoy

Roy Orbison- Ooby Dooby

Song of the day: Elvis Presley- That’s All Right

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In 1954, Elvis Presley recorded and released his first single ever: That’s All Right. The song was not written by him, because the original was made by Arthur Crudup, a blues singer. He already recorded it in 1946. Some parts of the text even date back to another song, which was made in 1926! The song was re-released in 1949, now on a new format: the 45 rpm single. This particular single was coloured bright orange, if you want to know. Elvis played the song in a break, speeded up the tempo and when the other musicians joined in, his first single was born. The song was played on a radio show, and again, and again… it never charted, though it sold 20000 copies. Enjoy

Elvis Presley- That’s All Right

Song of the day: Paul Anka- Diana

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In 1957, Paul Anka wrote a song about a girl he saw in church, although he hardly knew her. Others say the song was inspired by a classmate and friend of Paul Anka. However, he reached number 1 with the song in the UK and number 2 in the US, and he sold over nine million copies of the song. The song would be covered a lot of times, none reached the success Paul Anka had with it. Enjoy

Paul Anka- Diana